Marriage Isn’t As Big a Deal As You May Think

help my marriage

 

It was late, and my wife and I were getting ready to go to sleep. I rolled over and looked at her.

 

“What?” she asked, smiling at me.

 

I asked her a simple question: “How do you know that I love you?”

 

Certainly, I thought, it is going to be the surprise cruise honeymoon that cost thousands. Or maybe the book of 100 reasons why I love her that took over 10 hours to make. Or maybe the rose petals I saved from our proposal and pressed for Valentine’s Day. Surely, one of those things is how she knows I love her.

 

Her response left me speechless.

 

“Because you brought me my water bottle.” I had completely forgotten that I had grabbed her water bottle on the way to bed and handed it to her. She usually keeps it on her nightstand, but it happened to be in the kitchen, so I just brought it in.

 

“And because you did the dishes.” But she had cooked . . . isn’t that normal if she cooks and I clean?

 

“And because you text me during work.” Doesn’t everyone?

 

“And because you give me kisses.” Isn’t that for me too?

 

To be honest, I was a little bugged at first. She had mentioned so many little things that I hadn’t even thought about that I felt like my grand gestures hadn’t been appreciated. But then I remembered something I had read when we were engaged: “Marriage isn’t any big thing, it’s a lot of little things. Acts of kindness every day create a happy marriage” (John Bytheway, What We Wish We’d Known When We Were Newlyweds).

 

It wasn’t until my wife answered her own simple question that the quote made sense. That’s when I stopped looking for one really big way to yell “I LOVE YOU!” and instead made a goal to find lots of little ways to say the same three words.

 

But this advice isn’t just about marriage—it’s about all relationships, even those in our business and personal lives. Studies have shown that…

 

 

To read the rest of this post visit LDSLiving.com (source of picture as well).

 

 

3 Habits That Could Make You Lose Your Testimony Without Realizing It

This post had over 200k visits to LDSLiving.com. Read the whole post there.

 

losing my testimony

 

It was a blistering hot day in NYC.

 

I was 23 and had graduated from BYU two months earlier. Now I was nearing the end of my summer internship at a very fast-paced advertising agency.

 

From my apartment window, I looked out over the Hudson River where a city that shimmered with opportunity lay before me. The whole world was looking bright, but inside, I felt…cloudy.

 

I had doubts.

 

I wasn’t sure where to live after my internship, what to do for work, and worst of all, I went from having a huge support system in Utah where everyone encouraged me to choose the right and where gospel conversations were a norm, to a bustling city where my thoughts rarely fell on the gospel. And when they did, it was mainly questions about Church history. I began doubting whether or not I believed in the Church anymore.

 

But how could I—someone who prayed every day, hadn’t skipped a day of reading my scriptures since I was 15—have doubts? In my mind, doubts were for those people who had serious struggles in life or who chose paths that took them away from the Church—not for an active returned missionary like me. Right?

 

It was at this time of great confusion that my friend called me from the airport, en route to his mission. After a few minutes of talking he said, “Zack, you don’t sound good.”

 

 

 

To read the rest of the post and the three things that that might make you be losing your testimony, go to LDSLiving.com.